Greg Ginn – Let It Burn (Because I Don’t Live There Anymore) 1994

Greg Ginn – Let It Burn (Because I Don’t Live There Anymore)

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Let It Burn marked Greg Ginn’s third solo release in less than a year, following an extended period away from the spotlight to run his SST, Cruz, and New Alliance labels. (Only figures like Frank Zappa approach such prolific drive.) As is true of his other solo albums (Getting Even, Dick), the emphasis is on raw, angular noise that sneaks up and steps on your expectations. Ginn’s songwriting remains preoccupied with personal freedom and the ways people betray each other. A resigned misanthropy hangs over tracks like “Drifting Away” (“If you want the truth, you’ll have to wait for that”), and “I Don’t Want It” (“I can’t stand the waiting anymore/I need you like a hole in the head”). “On a Roll” fires off an edgy declaration of intent, while the guitars sputter and snarl underneath the rhythm (“I don’t wanna think I’m wasting away”). There’s no love or escapism here. Ginn naturally vents his paint-peeling instrumental side. “Lame Hollywood Cop” is punked-out hip-hop driven by shuddering guitars and ferociously slapped bass. Ginn plays with a similarly percussive slant on “Military Destroys Mind/Body.” “Exiled From Lame Street,” on the other hand, effectively flicks between low rider-style funk and a stoner’s crawl to make its mournful point — with plenty of squawking leads to match. On the minus side, this album’s not as distinctive as other Ginn offerings. A nagging sameness dogs the arrangements — “Lame” pops up in three titles — and Ginn’s vocals are workmanlike at best (when you can hear them). Students of the rapid-fire, dirty-bottomed guitar chunk that characterized his Black Flag days will probably appreciate Let It Burn most; otherwise, stick with Getting Even.

Greg Ginn Let It Burn - 1994

Unquestionably the most influential guitarist to emerge from the late-’70s/early-’80s U.S. hardcore/punk movement was Black Flag’s Greg Ginn. Never afraid to incorporate other musical styles into his playing (namely jazz fusion and Black Sabbathy heavy metal), as well as squealing feedback from his amplifier, Ginn’s guitar also served as a major ingredient to the Black Flag sound as he was the only original member to remain in the group from its formation until its demise. Influenced equally by the Grateful Dead and the Stooges, Ginn formed Black Flag in 1977, but the group didn’t really start to make a name for itself until Ginn set up shop in Hermosa Beach, California in early 1979, where he began running an electronics supply business. It was during this time that the phrase “SST” was coined (an abbreviation for Solid State Transmitter), which would eventually be used for the name of Black Flag’s record label. Although members came and went at a steady rate (including singers Keith Morris, Ron Reyes, and Dez Cadena), Black Flag prevailed, building a large and loyal following on the strength of their explosive live show, EPs/singles (including such classics as Nervous Breakdown and Jealous Again), and an appearance in the cult classic L.A. punk documentary The Decline of Western Civilization. Ginn also began to favor a Plexiglas “Dan Armstrong” guitar, which would soon become a trademark of sorts for both him and the band (despite eventually becoming covered with black tape).

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Black Flag began to make a nationwide impact when big-time Flag fan Henry Rollins signed on as the group’s fourth vocalist, which resulted in the group’s first-ever full-length album, 1981’s Damaged, considered by many as one of the greatest hardcore albums of all time. Although legal red tape would keep Black Flag from issuing a follow-up as quickly as they would have liked (which included Ginn being sent to jail for five days), the band returned more ferocious then ever, with such releases as My War and In My Head, among others. Black Flag also managed to issue a completely instrumental release, Process of Weeding Out, which inspired Ginn to launch his own instrumental project, Gone, resulting in a pair of releases around this time as well, Let’s Get Real, Real Gone for a Change, and Gone II: But Never Too Gone. Additionally, Ginn launched another side project around this time, October Faction, which included contributions from many other SST artists. Black Flag broke up after a final U.S. tour in 1986, and while many assumed that Ginn would simply play with Gone full-time, he decided to focus on record company work, forming an all-new label, Cruz, while running the Minutemen’s former label, New Alliance, as well as SST.

Geg Ginn Dick 1993
Geg Ginn & The Tayor Texas Couty -  Legends Of Williamson County 2011The early ’90s saw Ginn return from his exile as he began issuing solo albums, including such titles as Getting Even, Payday, Dick, and Let It Burn, as well as surprisingly relaunching Gone. Ginn has also performed alongside other acts (Mojack, Hor, Killer Tweaker Bees, etc.), briefly operated a coffeehouse, The Idea Room, and has been known to appear under an alias, Poindexter Stewart, on his own radio program, Screw Radio. In 2003, Ginn put together a new version of Black Flag (he and Cadena were the only recognizable names) to perform benefit shows for several different cat rescues. Ginn moved to Taylor, Texas in 2004 and created a new instrumental band called the Texas Corrugators; he played everything but drums, which were handled by Steve DeLollis.

Greg Ginn Getting Even 1983They recorded two albums, Bent Edge in 2007 and Goof Off Experts in 2008. (Live outings included different personnel, with Ginn on bass and guitar, with guitarist Gary Piazza and New Monsoon’s Sean Hutchinson on drums.) Ginn describes their live sets as being 100-percent live improvisation incorporating rock, jazz, Latin, psychedelia, and country. In 2010 he changed the name of the band to the Taylor Texas Corrugators and released the album Legends of Williamson County on SST. Meanwhile, he continued to release experimental albums under his own name, including 2011’s We Are Amused and 2013’s.

Greg Ginn (Because I Don't Live There Anymore 1994

Album: VinylTitle: Greg Ginn – Let It Burn (Because I Don’t Live There Anymore)

Label: Cruz RecordsYear: 1994

Tracklist:

A1 On A Roll 2:33
A2 Taking The Other Side 2:31
A3 Lame Hollywood Cop 3:50
A4 Lame Excuses 0:47
A5 In Your Face Motherfucker 2:55
A6 Hey, Stupid Face 2:46
A7 Venting 2:53
B1 Let It Burn 3:07
B2 Drifting Away 2:01
B3 Military Destroys Mind/Body 1:47
B4 I Don’t Want It 3:28
B5 Destroy My Mind 3:29
B6 Exiled From Lame Street 3:22

Credits:

  • Bass – Greg Ginn (tracks: 3, 6, 10), Steve Sharp (tracks: 5, 13)
  • Drums – Andy Batwinas (tracks: 3, 6, 10), Erik Blitz (2) (tracks: 1, 2, 4, 7 to 9, 11, 12), Gregory Moore (tracks: 5, 13), Jimmy Hunter (4) (tracks: 1, 2, 4, 7 to 9, 11, 12)
  • Engineer – Andy Batwinas
  • Guitar – Greg Ginn
  • Producer – Greg Ginn
  • Vocals – Greg Ginn (tracks: 1, 2, 4, 7 to 9, 11, 12)

Recorded and mastered at Casa Destroy Studios, Long Beach, CA.

℗ 1994 Cruz Records

-Punk Monday

Pro Skateboarder Mike Vallely Is Black Flags Newest Lead Singer

Legendary Pro Skateboarder Mike Vallely Takes The Stage As Singer Of Black Flag

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Ron Reyes the former/new/now former Black Flag singer revealed he’s been booted out of the long standing iconic hardcore band Black Flag. Reyes tells reporters, the ousting happened on November 24 while the band was performing a gig in Australia. Mike Vallely, the professional skateboarder who fronted a short-lived Black Flag reunion in 2003, reportedly walked onstage, snatched the microphone away from Reyes, and ordered him off the stage.

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Reyes’ departure from Black Flag ended in Australia, but anybody who has followed Mike Vallley’s career knows it was destiny calling. Mike has been caught on tape in many fights over his legendary skateboard career and is known to be hard as nails against any opposition. So what a perfect job for the then Black Flag manager to hand Reyes his walking papers.

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Reyes shared through a Facebook post, explaining that Vallely, who is also a professional skateboarder, walked onstage, grabbed the microphone from him, and sang the rest of the set himself. “I would not be surprised if Mike V becomes the new singer for Black Flag,” Reyes wrote in November. “It is my opinion that they have been planning this for some time.”

Reyes flew home and posted to Facebook almost immediately.
You can read his entire Facebook post below:

“On November 24th 2013 the last night of the Australian Hits and Pits tour with two songs left in the set Mike V comes on stage stares me down, takes my mic and says “You’re done, party’s over get off it’s over…” He said something else to me but it was a lie so I won’t repeat it here. So with a sense of great relief that it was finally over I left the stage and walked to the hotel room. They finished the set with Mike V on vocals. There is much more that can and perhaps should be said. But for now I will spare you the gory details. The writing was on the wall since before we played our first show. So many things went wrong from the start. I was into things like having a good drummer, rehearsing and spending time on things like beginnings and endings of songs, being a little less distracted with tour life and a little more on the ball. You know things that would make our efforts worthy of the name Black Flag… Yes it is my opinion that we fell very short indeed and the diminishing ticket sales and crowds are a testament to that. However It was made clear to me that raising these issues was tantamount to a blasphemous stab in the back to Greg. How could I question him, his efforts and hard work? How could I dare be a fan of OFF! And or be friends and a fan of Flag? I was told that I had to choose sides. But I refuse to treat someone like an infallible Pope figure. No guitarist deserves such unquestioning blind devotion. And so I have been excommunicated in a very strange fashion. I truly feel sorry for anyone who had to witness the infantile behavior and the relentless provocation I was subjected to both on and off the stage. I regret that under such fierce provocation and taunting I sometimes responded in manners bellow my standard. I am grateful for the opportunities Greg gave me. There were some magical moments at first. I was naive enough to believe in the promise of potential. But in the end the good was no match for the overwhelming bad. It am proud of my contributions including the new album and its cover. Come on folks it’s only rock n roll. I would not be surprised if Mike V becomes the new singer for Black Flag. It is my opinion that they have been planning this for some time. I wish them well. Mike is a true disciple of Greg and so they have a good working relationship. And ironically the tension over the last weeks has brought out some of Greg’s best playing. So it could be interesting. I will miss playing with Dave Klein. He is a great kid and truly an outstanding bass player. Dave was an anchor that kept me from losing my place on a nightly basis. Trust me that was no easy task for either of us. I truly apologize for being in or more accurately “appearing” to be in competition with “Flag”. They know my heart on this matter. From the beginning I was happy for them and fully supported and understood why they would want to rock those songs and have a good time with friends and family. Yes I questioned their use of the name and logo but in no way questioned their motivation or right to do their thing. I envy them for they have succeeded in ways that were never possible with “Black Flag”. And once again for the record, I agreed to do Black Flag before I knew there was a Flag. I mean no malice towards Greg or Mike although they will most likely see things very differently. I wish them luck and prosperity. I have learned many valuable lessons this year. And these lessons will enrich my personal and musical endeavors. Cheers. Ron Reyes.”

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Vallely denies that the personnel change was planned ahead of the Australian gig. Vallely claims that Reyes — who originally handled vocals for Black Flag on 1980’s Jealous Again EP — became “disgruntled” and “combative” throughout the tour, noting that he and Greg Ginn, the only consistent member of Black Flag, had different opinions about the group’s future.

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“We feel that, generally, the band fell short in 2013 because of a difference in the philosophies of Ron and Greg — it just led to dysfunction,” says Vallely who previously fronted a short-lived Black Flag reunion in 2003 and teamed up with Ginn last year for a project called Good for You. “Greg just felt like, ‘I don’t want the Black Flag name to fizzle out with this or be tainted with this record that’s proven to be sub-par compared to what the expectations for it were.'” Vallely explained further, saying, “He told me he made a mistake by working with Ron and trying to pander to a sort of old-school thing. He just thought that I was the guy for the job… I’m not gonna say no to that.”

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According to the new/old Black Flag singer, Reyes was more interested in playing the band’s classic material, while Ginn wanted to focus on writing new music. Vallely also alleges that Reyes tried to leave the group before he was fired, and insists that the only reason Reyes was given the ax onstage was because it looked as though he was going to quit in the middle of the concert.

“I did not threaten him or physically remove him from the stage,” Vallely says. “I just told him very plainly, very simply, that it was over. And he looked at me and he almost seemed relieved. Then he walked off the stage.”

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Looking to the future, Black Flag are hoping to redeem their less-than-stellar 2013. “It could have been better,” Vallely admits. “Black Flag can be a stronger, more cohesive, tighter band. We want to prove that.”

The singer says that the elder punks are already working on new material, and are gearing up for a “pretty extensive” tour that is expected to begin in May. As for the reception to last year’s What The…, Vallely said, “I talked to Greg about the legacy of Black Flag” and he said, ‘I write a lot of music, and I’ll write a lot more music. I’m not gonna cry over one fucking record.'”

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-Rich Monday